What is TSCA?

TSCA (toss-ka) stands for the Toxic Substances Control Act. Passed in 1976 under President Gerald Ford, it is our nation’s main law aimed at regulating chemicals used in every day products. The Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families coalition is calling for an overhaul of TSCA based on the law’s inability to protect the American public from exposure to harmful chemicals.
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Factsheet: Chemicals in Commerce Act

Sharing many elements with the Chemical Safety Improvement Act, newly introduced House legislation Chemicals in Commerce Act makes clear policy choices that undermine public health and environmental protection in the name of reform.
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FAQ: Sorting out Key Questions About the Elk River Chemical Spill

On January 9, 2014, a large leak began at Freedom Industries’ storage facility along the Elk River in West Virginia, sending a chemical spill into the river. The location of the spill is just upstream from a water intake for the West Virginia American Water Utility Company. The chemicals in the spill entered the water supply and were piped to the homes of 300,000 people.
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How the Failures in our Toxics Law Put People in Danger in the Elk River Spill

After the chemical spill into the Elk River, there was very little to no information on the chemicals in the spill and how they affect human health and the environment. This is because we don't have strong regulation of toxic chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).
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Hazardous 100+ Chemicals Detected in the Great Lakes

The Great Lakes, the largest freshwater resource in the world and a national treasure, is polluted by historical and ongoing releases of hazardous chemicals. Many chemicals still used in commercial products today pose hazards to the Great Lakes. This map locates the worst areas of contamination.
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Sportsmen and Safer Chemicals

New studies show that toxic chemicals have significant effects on wildlife populations, reproduction and the health of fish and game. How should a concerned sportsmen respond?
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Safer Chemicals: Good for Health and Good for Health Care

Health care institutions across the country have reduced exposures to harmful chemicals by eliminating known and likely hazards and switching to safer alternatives. These institutions reduce their disposal costs and liability while improving the overall health of employees, patients, and communities.
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Congressional Action Needed on a Chemical of High Concern: Bisphenol A (BPA)

BPA is a very common chemical found in plastics, food and beverage can linings, and other consumer products. BPA is known to mimic estrogen and, in animal studies, researchers have linked developmental exposure to BPA to reproductive harm, increased cancer susceptibility, and abnormalities in brain development and fat metabolism.
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The President's Cancer Panel Report

In a groundbreaking report released in May of 2010, the President’s Cancer Panel provided strong confirmation that exposure to toxic chemicals is an important and under-recognized risk factor for cancer, and recommended that the Government take immediate action to reverse this trend.
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Congressional Action Needed on a Chemical of High Concern: Asbestos

Despite everything we know about its toxicity, asbestos continues to be used in things like roofing materials and disc brake pads. If asbestos-containing materials such as insulation, flooring, and ceiling tiles become old and flake, then the asbestos fibers can become airborne and breathable.
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Chemicals and the Obesity Epidemic: the Link

Obesity is a major and growing problem in the United States. Shockingly, about one in three adults is obese, and today’s children and teens are three times as likely today to be obese as they were 30 years ago. Changes in diet and exercise in the last several decades are generally believed to be at the root of the problem. But a growing body of research is finding that toxic chemicals also may be part of the problem.
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Men's Health and Toxic Chemicals

Listen up, men! Believe it or not, every day you are exposed to a host of harmful or untested chemicals. These chemicals can be found in everyday items, from your smartphone to your wrinkle-free dress shirt, putting you at risk for conditions related to sexual and reproductive health and fertility.
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The Safe Chemicals Act of 2011 - S. 847

On April 14, 2011, Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) introduced the Safe Chemicals Act (S. 847), which would take meaningful steps to protect American families from harmful chemicals.
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Shaping Chemicals Policy Reform: Public Health Advocates vs. the Chemical Industry

Reform of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), our federal system for overseeing chemical safety, is now on the national agenda. This is welcome news because TSCA has failed to protect public health and the environment from toxic chemicals, in the process threatening the competitiveness of American industry in a global market that increasingly demands safer products. This factsheet defines the key differences between what public health advocates want and what the chemical industry wants from TSCA reform.
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The Business Case for Comprehensive TSCA Reform

Using safer chemicals makes sense for our economy, health, and environment. Designing new chemicals to be safer from the start reduces the costs of regulation, costs of hazardous waste storage and disposal, costs of providing worker protections, and potential liabilities.
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Public Opinion: Overwhelming Support for Tighter Controls on Toxics.

New public opinion research finds overwhelming public support amongst voters for tightening regulations on toxic chemicals.
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Public Opinion: Americans Want More Protection from Toxic Chemicals

Majorities of Democrats, Independents, and Republicans say they feel much more favorable [about TSCA reform] when hearing that the legislation will take chemicals off the market if they have been detected in babies at birth or in infants (Democrats—66 percent much more favorable, Independents—52 percent, Republicans—59 percent).
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Chemicals of Concern

Here’s a list of chemicals linked to serious environmental and health problems, including cancer and reproductive disorders. Examples include: Formaldehyde, Heavy metals, Hexane, Hexavalent chromium, Methylene chloride, PBTs, PCBs & DDT, PFCs, Phthalates, Toxic Flame Retardants (PBDEs), Toxic Flame Retardants (TDCP and TCEP), Tricholoroethylene (TCE), and Vinyl chloride.
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Business Case Studies

Here you will case studies showing how leading businesses are eliminating toxic chemicals from their supply chains, asking chemical manufacturers for more safety information, and calling on Congress to put common sense limits on chemicals that could harm their customers. Examples include: Kaiser Permanente, Catholic Healthcare West, Seventh Generation, Construction Specialties, and Perkins + Will.
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Meet the Chemicals

Want to know more about the toxic characters that have leached and off-gassed into every aspect of our lives? Check out our cheeky fact sheets on BPA, aka “hormone wrecker;” the contradictory flame retardant family; formaldehyde, aka “the undertaker;” lead, the notorious neurotoxin; annoyingly persistent PFOA; elusive phthalates; and tricky TCE.
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Chemicals of Concern Identified by the US EPA

The EPA has announced their proposed criteria for expanding their list of chemicals of concern that require action to reduce exposure. Check out the chemicals here for a guide to the known concerns and major uses of each chemical.
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